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XABF: Allen Bradley Full Duplex DF1 Protocol Driver v10.0


XABF: Allen Bradley Full Duplex DF1 Protocol Driver

General Information:


XABF allows you to use full-duplex DF1 protocol (System point-to-point) to communicate with ALLEN-BRADLEY PLC-5, SLC-500, PLC-4, PLC-3, PLC-2 and 1774-PLCs using any of the following adapters connected to the PC's

RS-232 port:
  • Channel 0 located in the processor

  • 1747-KE (DH-485)

  • 1785-KE (Data Highway Plus)

  • 1770-KF2 (Data Highway Plus)

  • 1770-KF3 (DH-485)

  • 1771-KE/KF (Data Highway)

  • 1770-KF2 (Data Highway)

  • No additional boards are required in the PC bus.

    To minimize the number of messages needed to poll all the required information, it is a good idea to concentrate all data to be transmitted in groups of consecutive integers within the PLC memory. Up to 16 ON/OFF status, 1 16-bit value, 2 8-bit values or even floating-point values (scaled to a range of 0 to 65535) can be encoded in each integer value sent or received.



    SLC-500 Items Naming:
    ---------------------
    This convention for accessing to the SLC-500 controllers' data

    is used by the following SLC-500 commands:
  • Generic Read using Text Notation.

  • Generic Write using Text Notation.

  • The general format of item names for data from SLC-500 controllers matches the naming convention used by the programming software. The format is shown below. (The parts of the name shown in square brackets ([ ]) are optional.)

    X [FILE] : ELEMENT [.FIELD] [/BIT]

    X:

    Identifies the file type. The list below summarizes the valid file types and the default file number for each type:

    X File Type Default File O *Output 0 I *Input 1 S Status 2 B Binary 3 T Timer 4 C Counter 5 R Control 6 N Integer 7 F **Floating P. 8

    * Output and Input file types may be Read Only depending on the SLC-500 model. ** Available only on certain SLC500 models. Check the Processor Manual for the model being used. If the Floating Point file type is not supported, file 8 is reserved and unusable.

    FILE:

    File number must be 0-255 decimal. File 0 must be Output, file 1 must be Input, file 2 must be Status and so on for all the default file types. If this number is not specified, the default file number will be used.

    ELEMENT:

    Element number within the file. For Input and Output files it must be between 0 and 30 decimal. All other file types, it must be between 0 and 255 decimal.

    FIELD:

    Referes to the subelement number. If the file type is Timer, Counter or Control, then the subelement field must be replaced by its corresponing number. In some cases there is no reference needed for a subelement number, and if a subelement is included in the command, it will be ignored.

    BIT:

    Valid for all file types except Floating Point. Must be 0-15 decimal.

    DESCRIPTION OF THE AVAILABLE FILE ITEMS:

    ----------------------------------------

    OUTPUT FILE ITEMS:

    O[n]:e.s[/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be zero.

  • "e" indicates the element number in the file.

  • "s" indicates the sub-element number (0 - 255).

  • "b" specifies the bit (0 - 15 decimal.) "/b" may be omitted if necessary to treat the I/O group as a numeric value.


  • Examples:

  • O0:0/0

  • O:2/15

  • O:3


  • INPUT FILE ITEMS:


    I[n]:e.s[/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be one.

  • "e" indicates the element number in the file.

  • "s" indicates the sub-element number (0 - 255).

  • "b" specifies the bit (0 - 15 decimal.) "/b" may be omitted if necessary to treat the I/O group as a numeric value.


  • Examples:

  • I1:0/0

  • I:2/15

  • I:3


  • ADDRESSING I/O MODULES:


    The elements (words) in I/O modules are mapped into a memory table. If the Analog I/O modules are being used, then the point naming will differ from the point naming in the programming software. The Item Name must be computed from the sum total of words used by the previous input or output blocks regardless their relative position in the module rack. The operator can use the programming software Data Monitor to look at the memory map of the I file or O file to verify your address. If the address is unsure, or if the PLC configuration is likely to change, copy the points in question to the N table or B table and access the data from there.

    LABEL I/O MODULES WITH "WORD COUNTS":

    The address of any point within the I/O datatable space, in an SLC processor, is the sum of the words occupied by previous modules (to the left in the rack) of the same type. Therefore, to determine the correct address for any particular point in the I/O datatable, one must know the number of words each module will consume. Refer to the list below:

    N. of Words Module

    0 1747-L524 SLC 5/02 Module Processor
    1 1746-IA8 8 point 120VAC input module
    1 1746-OA16 16 Point 120VAC output module
    1 1746-IA16 16 point 120VAC input module
    4 1746-NI4 4 point 20mA analog input module
    4 1746-NO4I 4 point 20mA analog output module
    1 1746-0A8 8 point 120VAC input module
    2 1746-IB32 32 point DC input module
    Important note:

    In the table above, the minimum amount of words which can be consumed by a module is 1 (16 bits). This is due to the memory scheme of all Allen-Bradley processors.

    STATUS FILE ITEMS:

    S[n]:e[/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be two.

  • "e" indicates the element number in the file (0 - 255 decimal).

  • "b" is optional. If specified, it indicates the bit (0 - 15 decimal).

  • Important note:

    Refer to the SLC-500 Family Processor Manual (Allen-Bradley Publication) for a complete description of Status file information.

    Examples:
  • S2:6 (major error fault)

  • S2:13 (math register)

  • S:1/5 (forces enabled)


  • BINARY FILE ITEMS:


    B[n]:e/b or B[n]/m

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be three. If specified, the file number must be between 9 and 255 decimal.

  • "e" specifies the element (word) number within the Binary file. It must be between 0 and 255 decimal.

  • "b" specifies the bit number within the word. In the first form (where ":e" is present,) the bit number must be between 0 and 15 decimal.

  • "m" also represents the bit number. However, in the second form, no word number is specified and the bit number may be between 0 and 4095.


  • Examples:

  • B3/4095 (same bit as B:255/15)

  • B:6/4 (same bit as B/100)

  • B3


  • TIMER FILE ITEMS:


    T[n]:e[.f][/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be four. If specified, the file number must be between 9 and 255 decimal.

  • "e" specifies the element number (three words per element) within the Timer file. It must be between 0 and 255 decimal.

  • "f" identifies one of the valid Timer fields. The valid fields for Timer Files are listed in the table below (use the numeric order as reference). If "f" is omitted, it is assumed to be the word 0.

  • "b" is optional and is normally not used. All of the fields of a timer can be accessed by specifying the ".f" fields. However, it is possible to use "/b" to single out a bit in the .PRE or .ACC fields (which are words).

  • Order number Timer Fields

    0 .PRE
    1 .ACC
    2 .EN
    3 .TT
    4 .DN

    Examples:

  • T4:0.1 (means: .ACC)

  • T4:3.4 (means: .DN)

  • T4:1.0 (means: .PRE)


  • COUNTER FILE ITEMS:


    C[n]:e[.f][/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be five. If specified, the file number must be between 9 and 255 decimal.

  • "e" specifies the element number (three words per element) within the Counter file. It must be between 0 and 255 decimal.

  • "f" identifies one of the valid Counter fields. The valid fields for the Counter Files are listed in the table below (use the numeric order as reference). If "f" is omitted, it is assumed to be the word 0.

  • "b" is optional and is normally not used. All of the fields of a counter can be accessed by specifying the ".f" fields. However, it is possible to use "/b" to single out a bit in the .PRE or .ACC fields (which are words).

  • Order number Counter Fields

    0 .PRE
    1 .ACC
    2 .CU
    3 .CD
    4 .DN
    5 .OV
    6 .UN
    7 .UA

    Examples:

  • C5:0.1 (means: .ACC)

  • C5:3.5 (means: .OV)

  • C5:1.0 (means: .PRE)


  • CONTROL FILE ITEMS:


    R[n]:e[.f][/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be six. If specified, the file number must be between 9 and 255 decimal.

  • "e" specifies the element number (three words per element) within the Control file. It must be between 0 and 255 decimal.

  • "f" identifies one of the valid Control fields. The valid fields for the Control files are listed in the table below (use the numeric order as reference). If "f" is omitted, it is assumed to be the word 0.

  • "b" is optional and is normally not used. All of the fields of a Control file can be accessed by specifying the ".f" fields. However, it is possible to use "/b" to single out a bit in the .LEN or .POS fields (which are words).

  • Order number Control Fields

    0 .LEN
    1 .POS
    2 .EN
    3 .DN
    4 .ER
    5 .UL
    6 .IN
    7 .FD

    Examples:

  • R6:0.0 (means: .LEN)

  • R6:3.2 (means: .EN)

  • R6:1.1 (means: .POS)


  • INTEGER FILE ITEMS:


    N[n]:e[/b]

  • "n" represents the file number and is optional. If not specified, it is assumed to be seven. If specified, the file number must be between 9 and 255 decimal.

  • "e" specifies the element number within the Integer file. It must be between 0 and 255 decimal.

  • "b" is optional. If specified, it indicates the bit (0 - 15 decimal).


  • Examples:

  • N7:0

  • N7:0/15

  • N7:3


  • FLOATING POINT FILE ITEMS:


    F[n]:e

  • "n" represents the file number (optional). If not specified, it is assumed to be eight. If specified, the file number must be between 9 and 255 decimal.

  • "e" specifies the element number within the Floating Point file. It must be between 0 and 255 decimal.


  • Examples:

  • F8:0

  • F8:2



  • IMPORTANT NOTES:

    ---------------- Remember to configure the 1747-KE using the following settings:

  • Use the DF1 FULL DUPLEX Protocol

  • Use the checksum mode (BCC or CRC) as stated in HMITalk1.DriverP5 parameter.

  • Use the baud-rate, parity, stop bits and data bits that are currently used in the driver settings.

  • You should verify these settings by connecting your PC to the 1747-KE CONFIG port using an ASCII terminal (i.e. PROCOMM or XTALK) and then follow the steps described in the 1747-KE User Manual.

    Be careful to include the 1747-KE node address as the source node in your HMITalk1.DriverP0 parameter if it is other than 0.



    IMPORTANT NOTES:

    ---------------- To be able to you want to communicate your PLC-5, a procedure must be loaded in the processor's memory or you will receive error messages. If the red led labeled "PROC' in the processor's front-panel is active, it means that no program is loaded and the communication will not work.

    To load a PLC program, follow these steps with the PLC-5 Programming

    Software from Allen Bradley supplied with your PLC device:
    From the main menu:
  • Enter the 'Who' option (F5)

  • Enter the 'Who Active' sub-option (F5)

  • Select your station and enter 'Online Program' (F1)

  • If you get an error such as 'PROCESSOR RAM IS FAULTED' (due to a battery problem, for example), press to clear memory.

  • Select the 'Restore Program' option (F6)

  • With the arrow keys, select the program to load.

  • Select 'Begin Restore' when you are done (F1)

  • Wait for a 'PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE MESSAGE' and press any key.

  • Now the program should be loaded and the communications working properly.

  • Be sure to turn the key in your PLC to the RUN position to activate your program.

  • If you want to edit the program while loaded, you may enter the 'Monitor File' menu option (F8)

  • Use 'Return to Menu' to go back to the main menu (F3)

  • Another cause of communication problems could be a mismatch in the communication parameters used by this driver and the PLC processor. Check which settings the driver is using.

    To change the communication settings in the PLC side (baud-rate,

    parity, etc), follow these steps:
    From the main menu:
  • Enter the 'Online Program' menu option (F1)

  • Enter the 'Monitor File' sub-option (F8)

  • Enter the 'General Utility' sub-option (F7)

  • Enter the 'Channel Overview' sub-option (F4)

  • If you get a 'NO ACCESS OR PRIVILEGE VIOLATION' message, be sure your PLC key is not in PROG position.

  • You will get a screen with some information to change, like Channel 0 active protocol (System Point-to-Point mode should be active when using this driver)

  • Enter the 'Channel Config' sub-option (F5)

  • You will get a screen with the current communication options. Move around using the arrow keys until you select the option you want to change.

  • Press 'Select Option' to explore the available options (F10)

  • Finally press 'Accept Edits' to put your changes into effect.

  • Don't forget to turn the key to its original position again (either RUN or REM)


  • Available Commands:



    Supported Devices:

    (This list is only indicative and may exist other unlisted equipment that are also communicable with this driver).


    This driver includes:



    Available Downloads:



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